Mushroom Cultivation as an Alternative Livelihood in Artisanal Goldmining Affected Communities in Ghana

Authors

  • Edwin Supreme Asare Center for Migration Studies, University of Ghana, Legon, Ghana
  • Jonas Ayaribilla Akudugu Department of Planning and Sustainability, University of Energy and Natural Resources, Box 214, Sunyani, Ghana
  • Michael Addaney Department of Languages and General Studies, University of Energy and Natural Resources, Box 214, Sunyani, Ghana
  • Amos Apraku Department of Languages and General Studies, University of Energy and Natural Resources, Box 214, Sunyani, Ghana
  • Alfred Ohenenana Appiah Centre for Distance Education, University of Energy and Natural Resources, Box 214, Sunyani, Ghana

DOI:

https://doi.org/10.26796/jenrm.v8i1.179

Keywords:

Alternative livelihoods, environmental degradation, mushroom cultivation, sustainable livelihoods, illegal gold mining

Abstract

This paper examines the potential of mushroom cultivation as an alternative livelihood for people who engaged in un-regulated artisanal goldmining (galamsey) in rural Ghana. Kenyasi, Gyedu and Ntotroso communities in the Ahafo region have experienced an upsurge of artisanal goldmining activities since Newmont Ghana Gold Limited (Ahafo Gold Mine) started a large-scale mining project in the area two decades ago. Using a case study and drawing on mixed methods approach, the results revealed that majority of the people who engaged in galamsey were already aware that mushroom cultivation is gainful and expressed interest in its adoption if the needed training and financial assistance were provided. Thus, relying on the concept of alternative livelihood, the paper argues that the cultivation of mushrooms presents a viable livelihood option for those desiring to move out of unregulated artisanal goldmining. The findings underscore the role that government and other stakeholders could play to address the menace: provision of skill training and financial support to enable them to create sustainable alternative livelihood in mushroom cultivation. The paper concludes that providing an alternative livelihood to illegal mining requires concerted efforts from both private and public sector role players.

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Published

2021-11-29

How to Cite

Supreme Asare, E. ., Ayaribilla Akudugu, J. ., Addaney, . M. ., Apraku, A. ., & Ohenenana Appiah, . A. . (2021). Mushroom Cultivation as an Alternative Livelihood in Artisanal Goldmining Affected Communities in Ghana. Journal of Energy and Natural Resource Management (JENRM), 7(2), 28-37. https://doi.org/10.26796/jenrm.v8i1.179