Review and Analysis of Ghana’s Power Sector Policies, Programmes and Reforms

Authors

  • E. O. Essandoh Department of Mechanical and Manufacturing Engineering, UENR, P. O. Box 214, Sunyani-Ghana
  • G. A. Akolgo Department of Mechanical and Manufacturing Engineering, UENR, P. O. Box 214, Sunyani-Ghana
  • E. N. Kumi Department of Mechanical and Manufacturing Engineering, UENR, P. O. Box 214, Sunyani-Ghana
  • T. Atta-Darkwa Department of Mechanical and Manufacturing Engineering, UENR, P. O. Box 214, Sunyani-Ghana

DOI:

https://doi.org/10.26796/jenrm.v7i1.168

Keywords:

Energy, Ghana, Power, Reforms, Sector

Abstract

Ghana has so far consumed about 60% (1580 MW) of its hydropower potential with the remaining untapped potential being just 820 MW. The country currently lacks adequate financial sources for harnessing renewable energy resources to generate electricity at the levels generated by developed countries. Thermal power which happens to be the best option to the country for firm power generation is relatively expensive. Nuclear power generation has not yet been implemented in Ghana primarily because of its safety requirements and the level of technical knowledge and commitment it requires. It is therefore incumbent on the country to carefully draw and strictly execute coherent energy policies to ensure the supply of affordable, reliable and sustainable power. This research reviews policy formulations, reforms and programmes of Ghana’s power sector from 1966 to 2019 with the aim of having a fair idea of the power landscape and proposing measures and workable solutions for a better understanding of the country’s electricity situation in the future. Among the workable solutions identified and proposed in this paper is the call on the government, not to sell out the state-owned power generating utilities and the need for it to have oversight responsibilities over the utilities in a manner that would not be adjudged as interference but rather help them to grow. The challenges faced by
Ghana in its energy sector are attributed to factors such as inadequate power supply for both internal and external consumption, disconnection between policy directions and implementation (i.e., gap between policy and implementation), politicization of energy policies, reforms and programmes, excessive government influence and inadequate investment in the power sector of the economy. Inadequate investment in the power sector appears to be the major cause of the rampant power crises in Ghana.

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Published

2021-03-31

How to Cite

Essandoh, E. O., Akolgo, G. A., Kumi, E. N., & Atta-Darkwa, T. (2021). Review and Analysis of Ghana’s Power Sector Policies, Programmes and Reforms. Journal of Energy and Natural Resource Management (JENRM), 7(1). https://doi.org/10.26796/jenrm.v7i1.168